Carrying the Flag


Reading time ( words)

The September 2019 issue of PCB007 Magazine concludes our month-long look at industry standards. We wrap up by "waving the standard" in celebration. Of course, that phrase immediately piques the interest of us wordsmiths. Why, after all, do English speakers use "standard" as a synonym for a flag?

The etymology of the word "standard" starts to answer that question. It is widely recognized and cited by scholars that by the mid-twelfth century, standard referred to "a flag or other conspicuous object to serve as a rallying point for a military force." Numerous etymologists suggest that the Franks (a Germanic tribe from the Rhine river regions) introduced the word "standhard," which meant to stand fast or firm. The "standhard" was a flag attached to a pole or spear, standing upright in the ground.

Tracing the history of flags and standards leads us to this quote from Encyclopedia Britannica: "In Europe, the first 'national' flags were adopted in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance… Toward the end of the Middle Ages, flags had become accepted symbols of countries, kings, organizations, cities, and guilds." The flag's dimensions became significant as well. Britannica continues, "Flags were subdivided according to their shape and purpose into standards, banners, guidons, pennons, and streamers. Of the main types, the standard was the largest, and from its size, was intended to be stationary. It marked the position of an important individual before a battle, during a siege, throughout a ceremony, or at a tournament. For the monarch, it marked the palace, castle, saluting base, tent, or ship where he or she was actually present."

The flag standard became the symbol of the "rule of law" and a rallying point for those who supported that particular institution. It's no small wonder, then, that the term has expanded to include other systems that function as law by mutual agreement. The process of reaching that agreement can be a long, arduous road to travel. In this issue, we look at standards both as processes and rallying points. Follow the standards, and your results will be both better and compatible with the rest of the industry.

To read the full article, which appeared in the September 2019 issue of PCB007 Magazine, click here.

Share




Suggested Items

Elmatica Offers Unique Thank You for Dieter Bergman IPC Fellowship Award

03/11/2021 | Elmatica
This is how Norwegian PCB broker Elmatica said “thank you” to IPC for selecting Jan Pedersen for the Dieter Bergman IPC Fellowship Award. And you think you've had a cold winter! The Elmatica team definitely has a great sense of humor. Let's all congratulate Jan for his work with IPC, including updating PCB standards and helping to streamline the design data process.

Quality and Continuous Improvement

02/24/2021 | Patrick Valentine, UYEMURA USA
The concern for quality control and reduced product variation can be traced back centuries. Archaic quality control methods were used by the Xia Dynasty in 2100 BC in ancient China. During the late 1290s in medieval Europe, guilds—the pre-cursor to unions—were responsible for product and service quality. From 1700 to 1900, product quality was determined by the individual craftsman’s efforts. At the close of the 19th century, Eli Whitney introduced standardized, interchangeable parts to simplify assembly.

IPC Addresses Critical Industry Skills Gaps With Electronics Workforce Training

12/22/2020 | David Hernandez and Carlos Plaza, IPC
Over the past three decades, IPC standards and certification programs have played a critical role in protecting public safety and promoting excellence by ensuring the quality, reliability, and consistency of electronic products. In 2019, IPC worked with its global network of certification centers to certify over 108,000 individuals across 200 countries and 21 languages to seven IPC standards. The ubiquitous adoption of these programs speaks to the strong partnership forged between IPC and the electronics industry.



Copyright © 2022 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.