AT&S Fights Energy Losses in Microelectronics; Joins CPES


Reading time ( words)

Energy plays a crucial role in microelectronics. As electronic components are becoming increasingly more powerful, they also require more energy. Scientists and technology companies therefore aim to develop methods and technologies to generate more energy and/or reduce energy requirements.

AT&S is now a member of one of the world’s leading research centres for power electronics and has joined the “Center for Power Electronics Systems” (CPES) of Virginia Tech (Blacksburg/Virginia). CPES comprises the “Who is Who” of the American and in part also the Asian power electronics market and focuses its research activities on improving the processing and distribution of electric energy. The fields of research range from microelectronics and battery-powered vehicles to regional and national electricity distribution systems. Among other things, CPES developed, together with five universities and many industrial companies, the IPEM (Integrated Power Electronics Module), a standard module that has revolutionised power electronics.

Energy consumption is one of the main challenges in the digital world. “The loss of energy in the form of heat is one of the greatest inefficiencies in technology,” says Hannes Voraberger, Head of R&D at AT&S. “CPES enjoys a good reputation worldwide for the progress in its research activities and has worked successfully with industry for many years.” Together with CPES and the know-how of numerous partners, the aim is to find solutions to overcome these challenges and develop new technologies to reduce the energy consumption and electricity required by microelectronics. An example of this is the so-called IC substrate core, the heart of IC substrates, which act as a "translator" between the microstructures of the circuit board and the nanostructures of microchips and which are used, for example, in high-performance computers. The IC substrate cores manufactured in Leoben are designed in such a way that the energy consumption in the chip can be reduced or less energy is required for the entire data transmission.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

University Students Point to the Future in their Research

04/23/2019 | Nolan Johnson, I-Connect007
Cutting-edge automation, AI, machine learning, and Industry 4.0 are all part of the response to the increasing demands for printed circuit boards that are not only faster, smaller, and cheaper but also higher-frequency, lower-loss, more temperature tolerant, and higher reliability. In many cases, it will be unique and advanced research coming out of the university system that will help move the industry forward.

The Sales Survival Handbook: Cold Calls, Commissions, and Caffeine Addiction—The Real Truth About Life in Sales

07/19/2017 | Dan Beaulieu
Imagine a sales book written by Jerry Seinfeld and you’ll get a good idea of what this book is like. Filled with all kinds of valuable advice, including everything from cold calling to handling rejection, the author uses humor to make us laugh at ourselves while learning how to be better salespeople.

Growth Ahead for Flexible Hybrid Electronics Industry

05/25/2017 | Heidi Hoffman, SEMI
According to Zion Research, “global demand for the flexible electronics market was valued at $5.13B in 2015 and is expected to generate revenue of $16.5B by 2021, growing at a CAGR of slightly above 21% between 2016 and 2021.” Key elements of the market, in the view of most analysts, include flex displays, sensors, batteries, and memory.



Copyright © 2020 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.