Just Ask Happy: The Proper Order of Design Techniques to Improve Connectivity


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We asked for you to send in your questions for Happy Holden, and you took us up on it! The questions you've posed run the gamut, covering technology, the worldwide fab market, and everything in between. 

Here is a question that relates to a topic near and dear to Happy's heart: improving connectivity.

Q: There are usually several ways to improve connectivity on any board (including HDI boards). But are there any general principles for which order these features should be added to achieve the best results?

A: From a connectivity and density improvement standpoint, the use of blind vias (either drilled or lasered) offers the greatest gain, especially since the pitch of active components that drives density is shrinking. Next is the reduction of the diameter of via holes and smaller annual rings. Reducing traces and spaces comes next if you do not run into impedance and signal losses, and then blind vias. The final step is adding more layers.

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