Lee Ritchey Discusses His ‘Homemade’ NASA Board



In this audio interview, Lee Ritchey shares a story about his favorite PCB design—a board that he built on his kitchen table early in his career for a radio used on the Apollo 11 spacecraft. Lee explains how he ended up working on this design as a young engineer, as well as the excitement that he felt watching Apollo 11 land on the moon while carrying his PCB. He also jokes about why his wife was less than pleased with his handiwork when he drilled holes in the board on the kitchen table.

To download this audio (mp3) file, click here.

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