Specialist Coatings for Specialist Applications


Reading time ( words)

Taiyo America’s Josh Goldberg agreed to spend a few minutes with me at productronica recently, where he indeed climbed out of the box and explored the broader market for high-performance polymer coatings in the electronics industry.

Pete Starkey: It's great to see you here at productronica, Josh. The show looks pretty busy and pretty active; what's your view of the market in general, and how do you see the market trends?

Josh Goldberg: With Taiyo, my specific function is not only looking at the PCB markets, but also looking at new markets. What that includes are areas where traditional soldermask may not have been thought of before, but the properties of it can transition very well into some new markets, specifically things like solar, displays, and lighting, as well as some printed electronics or roll-to-roll type printing for additive manufacturing of electronics. What I've been doing is visiting a lot of OEMs and research institutes, think tanks, as well as customers, and finding out what it is that they would like to see from Taiyo in the future. What types of materials, or material properties do they want to see? I think a good example of that is the LED market, for instance.

With the whole light bulb industry shifting from using tungsten filaments, it's left a large vacuum to fill that space. Some of the technologies positioned for the lighting market are LEDs, fluorescent lighting tubes, and OLEDs—organic LEDs. However, currently, it looks like LEDs are positioned to fill a lot of that space that was left behind by the tungsten type of light bulbs. What we've been doing is focusing specifically with the manufacturers and finding out what's critical to them for a soldermask property. Obviously, reflectivity is one of them, but there are also a number of other properties that they like to hit on as far as what they like to see out of a product from Taiyo. We've then been concentrating our resources into trying to boost Taiyo products to the next level. It is not just about solder mask on PCBs anymore, but more of a high-performance material for some of these new, high-performance types of devices.

Taiyo_Josh_Pete.jpg

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Future Trends in Flying Probe Testing

11/29/2019 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
Peter Brandt, director of sales for Europe and Japan at atg, sits down with Pete Starkey and Barry Matties, gives his views on market requirements and testing technologies, and explains how flying probe testing is becoming the industry standard at all levels of production—and in many cases, the only practicable solution.

Decreasing Bend Radius and Improving Reliability- Part II

11/22/2019 | Kelsey Smith, All Flex
Many of the issues that arise when using a flex circuit come from a lack of knowledge about how to properly design one, especially when the circuit is required to bend. Many novices will design a circuit that calls for bending the flex in too tight of a bend radius, which can cause damage to the circuit and lower the reliability of the end product. This series of articles will focus on the seven key aspects to consider when designing for maximum durability and maximum “flexibility”.

Solder Mask Tack Dry

11/08/2019 | Nikolaus Schubkegel
As a general rule, the tack-dry temperature should be as low as possible; in other words, it should only be as high as necessary. If the temperature is too low, the evaporation rate for the solvent will be to slow, and the solder mask will not dry in a reasonable amount of time. If the temperature is too high, however, the dry time certainly will be excellent, but it could create a solder mask lock-in with repercussions by the developing time.



Copyright © 2019 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.