iNEMI to Hold Webinar on Assessment of Lead-Free Solder Joint Reliability


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The accelerated testing typically done by industry can be very deceptive unless the results can be counted on to somehow reflect performance in service. As far as lead-free solder joints are concerned, this is more often an issue than commonly recognized. In general, reliability engineers need to know when “best in test” is unlikely to mean “best in service,” how large deviations may be, and which comparisons can be counted on to be conservative.

Binghamton University has recently completed a mechanistically justified model for the thermal fatigue of lead-free solder joints which allows for the generalization of observed trends. Even if not used to predict actual life in service, this model leads to recommendations for test protocols and guidelines.

iNEMI will be holding a research webinar on September 28, 2016, at 11:00 a.m. EDT (North America)/5:00 p.m. CEST (Central Europe), that will review some of the leading issues related to testing lead-free solder joints and discuss the Binghamton University model.

The webinar will be conducted by Dr. Peter Borgesen, Professor of Systems Science & Industrial Engineering and a member of the Materials Science program at Binghamton University. His research focuses on the assessment and optimization of reliability.

This webinar is open to members and non-members, and registration is free.  For more information and to register, click here.

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