Eagle Electronics Invests in Quality and Reliability with ATG A7a Flying Probe Tester


Reading time ( words)

Eagle Electronics has recently placed an order for a new ATG A7a automatic flying probe tester. The new tester will allow Eagle to test 100% of their boards via flying probe. The strategy is to utilize the new machine as the testing workhorse while their existing three Microcraft flying probe machines will primarily be used for retest and verification. The intent is to continue to test in panel form for most products. In automatic mode, the new machine will segregate good and bad boards automatically.

Some key features of the A7A include:

  • fully automated test system for production and customized panel
  • for lights out operation
  • different type of products can be loaded in parallel
  • biggest panel size 650 mm x 535 mm
  • tension tools for automatic handling of flex boards down to 0.3 mm

The A7a machine also has the capability to test in Kalvin mode which can catch micro cracks and micro voids in small via structures through low ohm testing. This would not be the standard test, as it is considerably slower. However, on certain high layer count, HDI and high reliability boards it will be a beneficial capability. Delivery is expected late May.

President and CEO, Mike Kalaria stated, “As Eagle Electronics continues to grow at a rapid pace, it is important that we invest in our equipment and processes in order to meet the needs of our growing customer base. By implementing the A7a into our operations, we will not only increase the speed at which we are able to turn product, but it will also assure that everything we produce is top quality and free from any defects that could affect the customer’s final products.”

Delivery of the A7a is expected in late May in conjunction with the installation of two new Lenz drilling machines.

About Eagle Electronics

Since 1979, Eagle Electronics Inc. has provided our customers with the highest quality printed circuit boards at fair and competitive prices. From our modern 50,000 sq. ft. facility, we have been meeting and exceeding our customer's ever increasing expectations and requirements. From providing short standard lead times to very low premiums on quick turns we strive to provide the best total value in high technology rapid turn-around PCBs in the industry. Learn more at eagle-elec.com.

 

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Test and Inspection: Far Beyond Opens and Shorts

12/07/2021 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
Gardien Vice President Todd Kolmodin talks about test and inspection market drivers from his perspective as a test service provider. Andy Shaughnessy and Happy Holden go down the “microvia rabbit hole” with Todd, as well as explore how OEM design requirements are driving test and inspection functionality and processes. When board layer counts and feature densities force longer test times, the tradeoffs to profitability for manufacturers become time and accuracy. Minimizing time while maximizing accuracy calls for new methods, which Kolmodin explains.

Alex Stepinski: A Philosophical View

11/30/2021 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
"My philosophy is to rely more on sensors throughout the process to measure things non-destructively, then build a model for how you’re going to perform, and just validate against the model," said Alex Stepinski. "It’s the next step slowly happening worldwide. For instance, we’ve had 2D AOI for many years. Sometimes, this is complemented with electrical tests. Now, you start to see more 3D AOI happening. You see them putting more sensors on the AOI equipment for direct measurement. Then, you also have the traditional signal integrity testing."

New Methods for Quantifying PCB Design Weaknesses and Manufacturing Challenges

11/18/2021 | Nolan Johnson, I-Connect007
Gerry Partida explains, "The industry is at a new point in evolving how we look at building boards. Our industry has historically built boards and then tried to find a test for them. Then, when they found a test for it, they figured out that it needed to be analyzed before they built the board. We did this with electrical test. We built boards and down the road, as people started asking, “Why am I buying bad boards? We should electrically test them,” electrical test was introduced, reluctantly, into the test part of manufacturing printed circuit boards by suppliers or fabricators. Then they embraced it. But when we started testing boards, we did comparison tests."



Copyright © 2021 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.