Zuken Launches Latest Version of E3.series Software


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Zuken's latest version of E3.series—complete solution for electrical and fluid design—offers engineers a live-feel, collaborative environment, along with a range of individual and multi-user usability and productivity features, such as dynamic block functionality and a tabular terminal editor.

The E3.series 2016 has been enhanced to offer a smoother user experience for today’s globally dispersed design teams. Users can work simultaneously on one sheet and instantly see in the sheet tree if another user has opened it, as their user name is visible. And with the latest collaboration technology, including Oracle updates, all objects can now be accessed online. Unique to E3.series, hierarchy is available within a block and offers numerous productivity benefits. Dynamic blocks can be created by simply dragging components or symbols from the library onto a block, drawing internal connections as well connections to the outside, and creating hierarchies by placing hierarchy blocks ports.

The software's new cabinet layout features include automatic placement optimization when inserting, changing or deleting components; placing complete preconfigured terminal strips; and sorting terminal blocks according to customer criteria, as well as defining cabinet layout models for block components in the library.

Finally, the tabular editing functionality has been extended to allow terminal strips across a whole project to be managed and edited directly within a table, with modifications made automatically following changes.

Automatic adjustments are made after making changes, such as swapping components or reordering terminal strips. Also, new integrations with manufacturers' configuration tools make configuring and ordering strips quick and easy.

About Zuken

Zuken is a global provider of leading-edge software and consulting services for electrical and electronic design and manufacturing. Founded in 1976, Zuken has the longest track record of technological innovation and financial stability in the electronic design automation (EDA) software industry. The company’s extensive experience, technological expertise and agility, combine to create world-class software solutions. Zuken’s transparent working practices and integrity in all aspects of business produce long-lasting and successful customer partnerships that make Zuken a reliable long-term business partner.

Zuken is focused on being a long-term innovation and growth partner. The security of choosing Zuken is further reinforced by the company’s people—the foundation of Zuken’s success. Coming from a wide range of industry sectors, specializing in many different disciplines and advanced technologies, Zuken’s people relate to and understand each company’s unique requirements.

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